M.L. Calls for Gabe Leland’s Immediate Resignation

M.L. calling for the immediate resignation of Gabe Leland.

M.L. Calls for Gabe Leland’s Immediate Resignation

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

Journalist M.L. Elrick vows to battle for transparency in Detroit City Council race

“I started my career as a reporter 30 years ago and I spent much of that time putting government under scrutiny, exposing waste, incompetence, corruption. I’ve also told the stories of underdogs, people who are mistreated, abused, their rights denied,” said Elrick, a former Detroit Free Press reporter. “It’s no longer enough for me to be just the scorekeeper, it’s time for me to get in the game.”

Journalist M.L. Elrick vows to battle for transparency in Detroit City Council race

10c199f9-0e8a-48a2-b1e9-edfeb4ce294b-elrick_pic
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Detroit — Journalist M.L. Elrick laid out a platform of opportunity, safety and accountability Monday as he kicked off a campaign for an east side City Council seat. 

Elrick, with his family at his side, stood at the front entrance of the shuttered former paint store on East Warren Avenue that he worked at as a teenager, telling a small crowd that Detroiters need elected officials who “put public service above self-service.”

“I started my career as a reporter 30 years ago and I spent much of that time putting government under scrutiny, exposing waste, incompetence, corruption. I’ve also told the stories of underdogs, people who are mistreated, abused, their rights denied,” said Elrick, a former Detroit Free Press reporter. “It’s no longer enough for me to be just the scorekeeper, it’s time for me to get in the game.”

The Pulitzer Prize-winner and “Soul of Detroit” podcast host known for investigative reports involving elected officials turned in petition signatures Monday morning to be vetted for the August primary.

Elrick in a 2018 television investigation scrutinized Spivey’s collection of nominating petition signatures for the ballot in the last city election cycle. The report centered on allegations that Spivey and his campaign had misrepresented who circulated ballot petitions. In the report, Elrick noted it is unlawful for circulators to say they witnessed the signing of a petition when they did not. Spivey, in a written response to Elrick from an attorney, said campaign workers were given clear instructions to follow the rules in obtaining petition signatures. The letter added that a deadline for filing a complaint over the petition signatures had elapsed. 

Elrick is among a high-profile field of potential contenders for the seat. The East English Village neighborhood resident made his bid official a week after fellow contender Toson Knight, a youth mentor and dean of students for the city’s public school district, shared his intentions with supporters in the Eden Gardens neighborhood. Retired Wayne County Circuit Court Judge Virgil Smith also has said he plans to make a bid for the seat. Spivey’s chief of staff, Keith Jones, also has pulled petitions for the District 4 seat.

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

Podcast: Detroit journalist on his bid for city council

Authentically Detroit is a BridgeDetroit partner podcast that tells the stories of Detroiters’ lives through exposition and interview. In this episode, hosts Orlando Bailey and Donna Givens Davidson talk with M.L. Elrick, investigative journalist turned candidate for city council in District 4.

Podcast: Detroit journalist on his bid for city council

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Authentically Detroit is a BridgeDetroit partner podcast that tells the stories of Detroiters’ lives through exposition and interview. 

In this episode, hosts Orlando Bailey and Donna Givens Davidson talk with M.L. Elrick, investigative journalist turned candidate for city council in District 4.

Last week, Bailey and Givens Davidson critiqued the role of the media in Detroit and Elrick’s place in it. Elrick wanted a chance to respond.

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

‘Craig Fahle Show:’ Reporter M.L. Elrick Wants To Be A Detroit Councilman. Why?

“If I have a message to get out to the people of Detroit, I know how to do it, and I’m not going to be shy about doing it. And I’m not going to run from a camera and I’m not going to hide from a reporter. And in fact, I’m going to call reporters and I’m going to say, here’s what you need to know. Here’s what we’re doing.”

‘Craig Fahle Show:’ Reporter M.L. Elrick Wants To Be A Detroit Councilman. Why?

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

You probably recognize investigative reporter M.L. Elrick, the guy chasing after a politician in a parking lot or gettting into a shouting match with a criminal defense attorney after the Kwame Kilpatrick trial or questioning a state lawmaker about skirting the residency requirement.

Now the city resident, husband and father of two wants to trade in his reporter chops to run for Detroit City Council. Elrick, who has worked for Fox 2 and WDIV, just took a buyout from the Detroit Free Press, where he won a Pulitizer Prize in 2009.

“If I’m on the council, where I’m coming from will never be a mystery,” he says in an interview on the “Craig Fahle Show” on Deadline Detroit.

“If I have a message to get out to the people of Detroit, I know how to do it, and I’m not going to be shy about doing it. And I’m not going to run from a camera and I’m not going to hide from a reporter. And in fact, I’m going to call reporters and I’m going to say, here’s what you need to know. Here’s what we’re doing.”

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

I took a drive-thru coronavirus test. Here’s what it’s like

There’s no better way these days to make a spectacle of yourself than to start coughing — especially if it’s a convulsing, dry cough. Believe me, I know. I’ve been hacking since early February, or before the dreaded “unproductive cough” became a telltale sign of coronavirus infection.

I took a drive-thru coronavirus test. Here’s what it’s like

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

There’s no better way these days to make a spectacle of yourself than to start coughing — especially if it’s a convulsing, dry cough.

Believe me, I know. I’ve been hacking since early February, or before the dreaded “unproductive cough” became a telltale sign of coronavirus infection. Numerous medical professionals assured me it was not the virus, but when my temperature hit 100 degrees last Friday, my doctor finally wrote me a prescription to get tested.

I’d written just a couple days before about the city of Detroit’s new drive-thru testing site, but I had heard a local hospital was giving tests without an appointment. So, after my wife picked up my prescription — the doctor’s office ran it out to her in the parking lot — I dragged myself out of bed and drove out to get tested.

There was no line and no wait. But there was a problem: They very politely told me they were only testing medical professionals. Fatigued but resigned to spend the weekend isolated in my bedroom, I returned home and called the city’s appointment center for a date at the fairgrounds. After dialing 313-230-0505 I spent a minute or two on hold, spoke to a pleasant operator and got an appointment for 3 p.m. Monday.

Then it was back to bed.

Now, I’ve spent some pretty lame weekends in my time, but cooped up in a bedroom trying to avoid contact with everyone in my family — including the cat I dislike more than everyone, but who still counts me as her favorite — tops the list.

Monday morning arrived and, with it, an opportunity to finally get some answers.

I pulled on an old dust mask I had been keeping around, tried to tame my increasingly unruly hair, put on some sweats and headed to the fairgrounds. 

Now, I’m not the most prompt cat on the face of the Earth. And I figured a 3 p.m. appointment meant, get in line at 3, wait in your car and, sometime before 4 p.m., get waved forward and tested.

But I pulled into the rather bleak fairgrounds at 2:59 and a businesslike attendant asked me what time my appointment was. I said “3 p.m.” and, 1 minute later, he directed me to pull forward.

Where I expected to see lines of cars, I instead saw empty numbered lanes divided by traffic marking cones with signs advising “Please stay in your lane,” and “TEST BY APPT ONLY.”

Along the winding route were checkpoints where my driver’s license and prescription were examined on my way to the testing center. Everyone was polite and the operation was staggeringly efficient, but I’ve seen enough post-apocalyptic science fiction movies that I couldn’t help feeling a little sad and a bit lonely as I made my way along the barren fairgrounds to the covered area where about a dozen parking spots were set up next to teams giving the tests.

My test

The scene under the canopy was surreal: eerily quiet, with everyone in view dressed from head-to-toe in protective gear and plastic face shields.

After I pulled into my parking spot, a nurse motioned for me to hold up my ID and prescription again, then asked for my name and date of birth. I was wearing a dust mask I had found in my garage and she told me I could pull it below my nose, but to keep my mouth covered. Before giving me my test, she explained that the swab she would use to take my sample could cause my eyes to water and might make me choke or gag. 

Then she pulled out what looked like a 10-inch-long swab and pushed about 6 inches of it up into one of my nostrils. Maybe it’s because I have already had two similar tests for the flu this year, but I didn’t choke or gag. It  felt like the swab was going so deep into my sinuses that the tip might poke out my other nostril.

But, as promised, the ordeal took only about 10 seconds. And I was on my way with instructions to stay home and self-isolate until my test results come back in seven days or less.

The test site

Mayor Mike Duggan announced on March 25 that the city was partnering with local hospitals to operate a massive drive-through coronavirus testing site at the state fairgrounds starting on March 27.

It would be the culmination of a plan that started with a March 14 phone call from the mayor to General Services Administration Director Brad Dick while he was out of town visiting his mother. Duggan said he needed a testing site ready in two weeks or less.

The state fairgrounds quickly emerged as the leading candidate. For starters, most people in southeastern Michigan knew where the fairgrounds are located, which would be important for a site that would serve patients throughout the region. The grounds also include good access points to move people in and get them back out quickly. And there is a large canopy that could keep health care workers dry as they administer the tests.

After consulting with landscape architects, traffic planners and logistics experts, “we all immediately agreed it was a really good spot,” Dick said.

Next, the city had to find tents and and a heating system to keep health care workers warm while they tested hundreds of patients. The Joe Dumars Fieldhouse would allow workers to store samples in refrigerators, as well as have a break area and place for meals.

After a successful first day on March 27, high winds on Sunday wreaked havoc on the site. Dick deployed garbage trucks as a windbreak to minimize the weather’s assault on the tents, but some damage was still done.

By Monday, the first day with a full slate of appointments, Dick’s team had things back in order and the fairgrounds opened just a few minutes late for the first patients.

1,000 tests

I later found out that one of the volunteers working on the day I was tested was Councilman Roy McCalister Jr. of the Second District. At-large Councilwoman Janeé Ayers has also been volunteering. Council President Pro Tem Mary Sheffield reportedly stopped by, too.

Duggan has said the testing site has been so successful, officials hope to perform up to 1,000 tests a day — far more than their initial goal of 400 tests per day.

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

M. L. Elrick running for City Council after leaving Detroit Free Press

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter M.L. Elrick, who spent nearly three decades exposing misdeeds, dirty politicians, and wasteful spending in Detroit, is running for a seat on the Detroit City Council. Elrick announced his bid for council on his podcast ML Soul of Detroit on Tuesday afternoon.

M. L. Elrick running for City Council after leaving Detroit Free Press

ewscripps.brightspotcdn.com
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter M.L. Elrick, who spent nearly three decades exposing misdeeds, dirty politicians, and wasteful spending in Detroit, is running for a seat on the Detroit City Council.

Elrick announced his bid for council on his podcast ML Soul of Detroit on Tuesday afternoon.

“For 28 years now I’ve been a reporter trying to hold public officials accountable, and I’ve been kind of a lone gunman,” Elrick said. “I moved back to Detroit more than 20 years ago because I wanted to be a part of its comeback. It was important for me to be here for family and to help the city I’ve always loved.”

Elrick’s storied career at The Detroit Free Press ended this week after he accepted a buyout. In 2009, Elrick and his coworker Jim Schaefer won a Pulitzer Prize in local reporting for uncovering wrongdoing by then-Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. Their work triggered a criminal investigation and jail time for Kilpatrick.

Elrick also was an investigative reporter with WDIV-TV Channel 4 and WJBK-TV Fox 2.

Elrick is running for the District 4 council seat held by Andre Spivey, who isn’t expected to run for another term. Metro Times couldn’t reach Spivey for comment.

Since 1999, Elrick has lived in East English Village, where he serves on the neighborhood association’s board and is a frequent volunteer. He coached baseball and soccer at Balduck Park in the 4th District and helps with a charity fundraiser for the Clark Park Coalition, which provides recreation and educational programs for young people.

In high school, Elrick worked at a paint shop on East Warren Avenue in the 4th District.

“As a reporter, I’ve done so many stories about city government, exposed what’s wrong, talked about what could be better, and at some point, you say ‘I’ve done as much in this role as I can to make things better,’” Elrick said. “As a reporter you know a lot and you see a lot. It’s not quite the same thing as having a seat at the table. It’s definitely not the same thing as having a vote. But in terms of having the ability to expose wrongdoing, call for reform and make things better, not only can I continue to do that, but if I get elected, I’ll have a vote, and that’s a pretty powerful thing.”

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

Journalist M.L. Elrick to run for Detroit City Council

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist M.L. Elrick plans to run for Detroit City Council after leaving the Detroit Free Press.

Journalist M.L. Elrick to run for Detroit City Council

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist M.L. Elrick plans to run for Detroit City Council after leaving the Detroit Free Press.

Elrick has filed paperwork to create a candidate committee for the 2021 election. He said he accepted a buyout from the newspaper.

He and Jim Schaefer won a Pulitzer Prize at the Free Press for exposing scandals involving Kwame Kilpatrick, who resigned as Detroit mayor in 2008. Besides working at the newspaper, Elrick has been a reporter at metro Detroit TV stations.

“I think people know what I can do,” Elrick said Tuesday. “They’ve seen me for the last 20 years trying to get to the bottom of things, trying to make sure that government works, calling out people who are cheating us, people who are stealing, who are putting self-service before public service. That’s not going to change.”

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

Investigative reporter M.L. Elrick is running for Detroit City Council seat

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter M.L. Elrick, who spent nearly three decades exposing misdeeds, dirty politicians, and wasteful spending in Detroit, is running for a seat on the Detroit City Council.

Investigative reporter M.L. Elrick is running for Detroit City Council seat

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter M.L. Elrick, who spent nearly three decades exposing misdeeds, dirty politicians, and wasteful spending in Detroit, is running for a seat on the Detroit City Council.

Elrick announced his bid for council on his podcast ML Soul of Detroit on Tuesday afternoon.

“For 28 years now I’ve been a reporter trying to hold public officials accountable, and I’ve been kind of a lone gunman,” Elrick said. “I moved back to Detroit more than 20 years ago because I wanted to be a part of its comeback. It was important for me to be here for family and to help the city I’ve always loved.”

Elrick’s storied career at The Detroit Free Press ended this week after he accepted a buyout. In 2009, Elrick and his coworker Jim Schaefer won a Pulitzer Prize in local reporting for uncovering wrongdoing by then-Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. Their work triggered a criminal investigation and jail time for Kilpatrick.

Elrick also was an investigative reporter with WDIV-TV Channel 4 and WJBK-TV Fox 2.

Elrick is running for the District 4 council seat held by Andre Spivey, who isn’t expected to run for another term. Metro Times couldn’t reach Spivey for comment.

Since 1999, Elrick has lived in East English Village, where he serves on the neighborhood association’s board and is a frequent volunteer. He coached baseball and soccer at Balduck Park in the 4th District and helps with a charity fundraiser for the Clark Park Coalition, which provides recreation and educational programs for young people.

In high school, Elrick worked at a paint shop on East Warren Avenue in the 4th District.

“As a reporter, I’ve done so many stories about city government, exposed what’s wrong, talked about what could be better, and at some point, you say ‘I’ve done as much in this role as I can to make things better,’” Elrick said. “As a reporter you know a lot and you see a lot. It’s not quite the same thing as having a seat at the table. It’s definitely not the same thing as having a vote. But in terms of having the ability to expose wrongdoing, call for reform and make things better, not only can I continue to do that, but if I get elected, I’ll have a vote, and that’s a pretty powerful thing.”

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

Making a stand in a desperate land

DETROIT – For years, people have been fleeing the corner of Lakewood and Waveney on Detroit’s east side.

Making a stand in a desperate land

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

DETROIT – For years, people have been fleeing the corner of Lakewood and Waveney on Detroit’s east side.

If they heard voices, the message was clear: Run! Chuck Brooks says he got a different message.

Over the last several years, Brooks, a contractor, pulled together seven lots and began building his personal paradise in the shadow of two abandoned schools and across the street from a burned out home.

Instead of moving out of Detroit, Chuck Brooks is digging in.

His Chapter 10 is a story of hope. Watch the story in the video player above.

CLICK HERE for a photo gallery.

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit

No Payne, No Gain

A Detroit politician once told me that Detroiters were like crabs in a barrel; whenever one crab gets near the top of the barrel, the rest try to pull him down.

No Payne, No Gain

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
DETROIT (WJBK) – A Detroit politician once told me that Detroiters were like crabs in a barrel; whenever one crab gets near the top of the barrel, the rest try to pull him down.

Even though he’s currently serving a 28-year stretch at the federal penitentiary in El Reno, OK, I still think his assessment has some merit. Take the case of Terry Payne.

Payne was a talented Detroit public high school basketball player who found his green thumb – and stayed out of trouble – by hanging out at the 4-H hall on McLellan, just off Gratiot on Detroit’s East Side. Payne has since built a successful landscaping company. When he heard the 4-H club was closing, he bought the building. And, for the past couple years, he’s been working to get it fixed up and reopened. Happy ending, right?

Not exactly. Payne, whose business is located in Detroit, has endured break-ins and thefts. But the latest caper was the cruelest. Thieves stole equipment and other items Payne was planning to auction off to help raise money to complete the conversion of the shuttered 4-H building in a recreation center where Payne will base his Brighter Detroit non-profit.

A setback like this would cause plenty of folks to throw up their hands and pack it in. Here at Chapter 10, it got us wondering how we can ever build a better Detroit if bad ol’ Detroit keeps making it so damn hard?!?

So we asked Payne what keeps him going; why he continues to give so much to a city where there are too many folks taking stuff they haven’t earned and don’t deserve? We went looking for deep answers and eloquent explanations for Payne’s remarkable resolve.

That’s not q-u-i-t-e what we got.

Instead, Payne shared some simple wisdom that may be w-a-a-a-y more useful when it comes to saving Detroit than some delicate discourse.

See and hear it all for yourself in the video player above on this edition of Chapter 10.

Oh, and if you get inspired and want to get involved, check out Payne’s charitable endeavors at www.brighterdetroit.org or call 313-466-3787.

You can also watch every installment of Chapter 10 at www.fox2detroit.com/Chapter10 or by clicking on the Chapter 10 tab on Fox 2’s app.

Subscribe for campaign updates

Share this post with your friends

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Paid for by Michael Louis Elrick for Detroit